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Sexual Assault Survivors

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Advocates say there are steps we can take as individuals to understand “rape culture” and the roles we may play in it. Learning about how to interact with and respect each other can start as early as kindergarten.
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You might feel at a loss If someone comes to you for support after they’ve been sexually assaulted. What you do and say in the immediate aftermath can help, or make things worse.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
There’s no timeline for healing. The survivors in this episode have spent months and years finding ways to make themselves feel better physically, mentally and emotionally.
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Many survivors who choose to report to law enforcement say their interactions with officers left them feeling blamed, dejected and angry.
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Many survivors who decide to report their rapes don’t necessarily get justice. They must navigate the complicated maze that is the investigation process for sexual assaults.
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Survivors say the meticulous medical exam that some sexual assault survivors undergo can be taxing and retraumatizing. But the DNA samples collected become evidence that can make or break an investigation.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
There's a pervasive culture of disbelief in the media, pop culture, politics and law enforcement. Advocates say better training and resources for police could help.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
The way a survivor is questioned about the details surrounding a sexual assault can greatly influence their ability to access memories of that traumatic incident.

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