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SNAP

Picture of Elizabeth Chuck
"Se llevaron cada centavo", dijo una de las víctimas del robo de cupones electrónicos de comida del Programa Asistencial de Nutrición Suplementaria (SNAP), a quien ahora no le alcanza para comprar un regalo de Navidad para su hijo.
Picture of Giles Bruce
What impact will the increase have on food insecurity? It's a timely story worth tracking in your community.
Picture of Julia Baum
Why does one of the wealthiest countries in the world make its most vulnerable citizens choose between food or shelter?
Picture of Jessica Cejnar
Highly rural, the communities outside of Crescent City in Northern California are food deserts. “I hear from staff all the time, these kids are hungry when they come to school,” one school administrator says.
Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton
An estimated 755,000 people would lose benefits over the next three years if the rule change proposed by the USDA goes into effect.
Picture of Tonya Pavlenko
Even with help from food stamps and a federal nutrition program, nearly half of U.S. households receiving such benefits struggle to feed their families.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Arizona has the some of the strictest guidelines in the nation for welfare benefits. Tucson mother Jessala Grijalva can usually get what she needs for herself and her three children, but she’s found some surprising exceptions.
Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton
Trump's new budget wants to replace a portion of food stamp benefits with a box of "shelf-stable" items. For Native families who have endured such government-issued provisions in the past, that's a horrifying prospect.
Picture of Tracie Potts
Uncertainty about proposed budget and policy changes in Washington have put low-income and working families — and the programs and agencies that serve them — on high alert.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Arizona tends to try out new approaches and programs, but rarely sticks with such efforts long enough to bring about change.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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