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urban heat

Picture of Molly  Peterson
Thanks to climate change, the health hazard posed by extreme heat is growing. And practical solutions aren't meeting the challenge so far.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
Some Southern California students spend their days in air conditioning, but others are not so lucky even as temperatures reach over 100 degrees. And those hot classrooms can impact kids' ability to learn.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
If heat is the enemy, Marcela Herrera thought she was ready for battle last summer at her family’s north Los Angeles apartment.

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This year saw a scorcher of a summer, the hottest on record. Worse, it could be the coldest summer we’ll see in our lifetimes. In this webinar, we’ll glean lessons and insights from a yearlong Los Angeles Times investigation into extreme heat. We’ll also identify gaps in state and federal tracking efforts, and outline policy changes that could help. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

Apply today for our California Impact Fund for reporting that brings untold stories to light in the Golden State. 

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