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Devoted fans of Antidote no doubt read my interview with Mark Katches a few weeks ago. Katches was just named the editorial director for the Center for Investigative Reporting's new reporting project in California.

William Heisel's picture

A gravel pit near area homes has received a renewal of its permit although residents weren't given notice of the hearing.

Food is packaged with a veneer of sincerity. Contents are dutifully itemized along with tables showing the percentage of recommended nutrients, fat content, etc. But there is much that remains a mystery. You are never going to see a candy wrapper that says, "May contain lead."

William Heisel's picture

The World Health Organization today declared swine flu to be the first global pandemic since 1968, raising its pandemic flu alert to"phasesix" on a six-point scale. Careful with the definitions: while the disease caused by the H1N1 virus is considered to be moderate, swine flu is considered to be unstoppable and countries are urged to come up with long-term plans for combating its spread.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

Every doctor is entitled to a bad day, even a bad week.

Dr. Lawrence James Williamson (California License No. 73495), a family doctor in Windsor, Calif., has been having a very bad year.

In May 2008, Williamson was told he was not entitled to what he apparently thought was a free brunch at a Las Vegas hotel. He did something many denied a free meal have considered doing. He threw a fit, according to the Medical Board of California.

William Heisel's picture

New Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today released a new report on health disparities showing that:

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

During our first California Broadcast Journalism Fellowship we listened to Julie Rovner, National Public Radio’s correspondent on the Health Policy and Science Desk, talk on a panel about health care reform. But at NPR, "health care reform" is a banned phrase on the air. Reform, Rovner said, is not a neutral term so she opts instead for "health care overhaul." Whatever you call it, it's a huge and timely issue.

The June 8 edition of Newsweek has a must-read story about the world's most influential celebrity.

Weston Kosova and Pat Wingert meticulously detail how Oprah Winfrey uses her show, her magazine and her Web site as a platform for some completely loony health advice, including needle-and-thread facelifts, avoiding vaccines, daily hormone injections into the vagina to stop aging and thinking positively as an alternative to surgery.

William Heisel's picture

Gary Schwitzer is the professor that health reporters fear. With the creation of HealthNewsReview, he has brought back nightmares of having your work marked up in red and posted on a corkboard for everyone to see.

William Heisel's picture

A story today out of Nigeria had me thinking about my interview with Father William Cleary last month.

William Heisel's picture

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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