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Here's a recap of the latest developments on the health reform front, along with some helpful resources and story ideas for your community.

March 21, 2010, 10 p.m. PST

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

You have it all planned out ahead of what may be this weekend's crucial vote on health reform, right?

You carefully lined up your uninsured folks, community health advocates, Congressional delegates, doctors, local tea party members and hospital executives: all are on speed dial and waiting for your call over the weekend. Right?

Well, kudos to those of you who had time to prepare. If you didn't, here are some last-minute resources and ideas that may help you out this weekend:

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

Media coverage of health care quality often hinges on a doctor's personality, rather than measured quality outcomes. Here's a quick primer for journalists looking to do better reporting.

darshaksanghavi's picture

Insurance companies starting to approve medical tourism

Our take on the Robert Wood Johnson county health rankings

Portland churches respond after Tribune story, "O Father Where Art Thou."

Churches traditionally have helped provide services to the homeless. Are they stepping up in a time of need?

Even a doctor with dead patients in his past can find startup capital.

When Dr. Andrew Rutland was trying to set up shop in the old "Modern Woman's Clinic" building in Chula Vista, he tapped a friend for a loan: Dr. W. Constantine Mitchell.

According to records from the California Office of Administrative Hearings, where Rutland's case before the medical board is currently being heard, Mitchell loaned Rutland $50,000 to help him start his practice.

William Heisel's picture

A Crisis in Caring: California's School Nursing Shortage focuses on the critical shortage of school nurses in Northern California, and its impact on students, teachers, parents and whole communities. California's top leaders, local physicians and students with chronic illnesses weigh in on the crisis.

Kelly Peterson's picture

When her doctor told her she was a borderline diabetic, Rose Morales took the warning seriously. The 50-year-old Ventura woman had seen what diabetes had done to her relatives.

Valentine's Day should be a national holiday. Until it is, most of us have to work Feb. 14 every year and tango with our valentines at night.

Pity poor Dr. Amanda Waugh then.

She couldn't even look forward to a nice dinner and a long conversation about the plays of Tony Kushner over chocolate soufflé, because on Valentine's Day in 2009, she was stuck with the night shift at the La Palma Intercommunity Hospital's emergency room south of Los Angeles.

William Heisel's picture

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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