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This week, several newspapers across California published my investigative series focusing on the threats posed by nitrates in groundwater. The full stories with accompanying sidebar can be read here, along with multimedia resources that include video, photo slideshows, and a three-part series on nitrates by KQED Radio.

Julia Scott's picture

Melvin Baron has spent his career educating the public about health and medicine, first as a pharmacist and then as a USC Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy. He’s 77 now, and he confesses to some frustration with the handouts that pharmacists and doctors use to inform patients about health and medicine.

“Much of what we give you is lousy,” he told me. “It’s a lot of words. Most of it is way above the audience. It doesn’t resonate and it’s boring.”

Michelle Levander's picture

Experts say that nitrate pollution is a major threat to California future water supply, while some cities already spend millions of dollars to treat nitrates in groundwater. Second in a two-part series produced in collaboration with California Watch and KQED Radio.

http://www.californiawatch.org/remedies-nitrate-contamination-anything-quick-cheap

Julia Scott's picture

The water supply of more than two million Californians has been exposed to harmful levels of nitrates over the past 15 years – a time marked by lax regulatory efforts to contain the colorless and odorless contaminant. First in a two-part series produced in collaboration with California Watch and KQED Radio.

http://www.californiawatch.org/nitrate-contamination-spreading-california-communities

Julia Scott's picture

A new drug comes on the market that promises to improve people’s eyesight. “Clarivue! Make your cloudy days sunny again!”

Your editor says, “This Clarivue is like Viagra for eyeballs. It’s going to be flying off the shelves. Write up something for the Web in the next hour.”

Your next move should be to find out the NNT: the number needed to treat. It will help you answer the most important question: How many people would need to take Clarivue in order for one person to actually see better?

William Heisel's picture

Health Dialogues, a special series from KQED Public Radio exploring California health care issues, is seeking community voices to chronicle the health of their cities for our new blog, Our State of Health: California Reports. The blog will feature citizen correspondents from across California, filling us in on the latest news and attitudes in health from around the state.

Shuka's picture

An audio postcard from "We Gotta Dance," a social event for developmentally disabled people. The monthly dance is organized by the Arc of San Francisco, a nonprofit resource for people with developmental disabilities.

Shuka's picture

Take a tour of Creativity Explored's studio space, and see artists show off their work. Creativity Explored is an art studio in San Francisco's Mission District, where all the artists are people with developmental disabilities.

 

Shuka's picture

Who hasn’t come home from work with a company pen in their pocket? Used the work printer for directions to a restaurant on a Friday afternoon? Answered a call from their mom on the company cell phone?

In that spirit, we could consider Dr. Duane Stillions just one of the rest of us.

If only he weren’t a children’s physician with a drug habit.

Stillions, a 42-year-old anesthesiologist, was caught in May 2009 by Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC taking painkillers that were meant for kids undergoing surgery.

William Heisel's picture

(Cross-posted from HealthyCal.org)

As the governor’s revised budget makes all too clear, California is in a world of hurt. The deepest recession since the Great Depression has reduced personal incomes, retail sales, corporate profits and property values. Those are the things the state and local governments tax to provide the revenue to support the schools, universities, health and social services and law enforcement on which most of us depend in one way or another.

Daniel Weintraub's picture

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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