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Dr. Lipson writes his own blog called White Coat Underground, contributes and helps edit at Science-Based Medicine, and contributes to The Science Business Blog at Forbes.com where this piece originally appeared.

PalMD's picture

Clinical psychologist William Fals-Stewart should have quit while he was ahead.

While studying drug use at the University of Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions, Fals-Stewart was accused in 2004 of faking his data in reports to the federal government. In one case, he said he had studied more than 200 subjects, yet he only had consent forms for about 50.

William Heisel's picture

Whatever happened to retail health clinics? A few years back, we were hearing optimistic forecasts of a clinic in every Wal-Mart, offering reasonable prices for routine health care and hours convenient for working families.

While the number of such clinics has grown dramatically, from 200 to more than 1,000 between 2006 and 2008, their expansion seems to be leveling off, according to a recent American Medical News story:

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

It's common knowledge that newspapers and other news outlets have hemorrhaged jobs. Since 2007, about 30,000 jobs have been lost in the newspaper industry alone. 

Certainly there are good examples of highly competitive journalism jobs that offer decent salaries for trained, and experienced journalists. Although I have not researched the number of such listings, an anecdotal survey of colleagues, and my own browsing of job sites suggest there are fewer listings of jobs, and freelance opportunities that offer livable wages or decent rates. 

laurieudesky's picture

HIV/AIDS is an emerging public health problem in the Asian community in the United States. Rong Xiaoqing, a recipient of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, examines its impact for the Chinese-language publication Sing Tao Daily.

Part 2: Cultural tradition traps Chinese elder-abuse victims in U.S.

xqrong's picture

The Women, Infants and Children Program provides food vouchers and nutritional education to low income families. California runs the biggest WIC program in the nation -- 60 percent of all infants born in this state are enrolled in it. Now, the program's changing the kinds of food it recommends. Reporter: Rachel Dornhelm

aired on http://www.californiareport.org/

R_Dornhelm's picture

How do you tell the stories of children or teenagers who have stigmatizing health problems without causing harm once the story is published? Laurie Udesky offers tips for reporting with sensitivity — but still getting the story.

laurieudesky's picture

The Anaheim obstetrician accused in a patient’s death was part of a community of doctors on the fringe who had escaped the stigma of their pasts by treating immigrants.

Dr. Andrew Rutland was charged by the Medical Board of California in December of negligence after the death of a Chinese immigrant, Ying Chen, at a San Gabriel clinic. Rutland had been trying to give her an abortion, the board said, when he administered a fatal dose of lidocaine, an anesthetic.

William Heisel's picture

The new Healthy City Web site, launched this week, is designed for community activists, but it’s an intriguing data source for California reporters nonetheless, particularly if you’re interested in covering the connections between your health and where you live. Social services beat reporters (are there any of those left?) will find it useful, too.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

A conference on health disparities for an audience of journalists is bound to produce lots of story ideas, and the one under way in Washington, organized by the National Association of Black Journalists, is no exception.

Here are some ideas for stories that have emerged from two days (so far) of discussions:

marthashirk's picture

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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