Skip to main content.

Latest from the community

A loophole in California law means that insurers could require you to take a genetic test to qualify for long-term care insurance – and potentially deny coverage based on the results.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

Do you know how many hours there are in a week?

For doctors, the answer is on the tips of their tongues: 168 hours. As one medical resident recently put it to me, “When you are in residency, you start with the hours in the week and then subtract the few hours that you are not at the hospital. It’s not uncommon to work 120 hours a week. It’s the reverse human schedule.”

William Heisel's picture

In the heated debate over the new routine mammogram screening recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, not enough coverage has focused on our perception of risk.

It’s important context for all reporting on medical screening.

Journalist Merrill Goozner, who blogs at GoozNews, has a great post on this topic, and on the costs of our misperception of risk. He writes:

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

Blogs, twitters and daily print help keep us abreast of breaking news. But there's nothing like an old-fashioned book to get inside a big sweeping tale. In the summer of 2007, when I was a fellow here, I had little more than a vision for a book that explored Big Pharma. Well, I also had some solid sources, a blockbuster drug, and a dramatic plot that spanned some 20 years. The hard part was finding a place to adequately tell the tale.

ksharp's picture

Diabetic children are in jeopardy of dying in the classroom due to a severe shortage of California registered school nurses. There are 15,000 school districts in California and less than 50 percent of those districts have a registered nurse on campus. Current law in California requires only a reg

Kelly Peterson's picture

Have you ever worked on a story where you knew that you were just one source away from a blockbuster? But you could never find that one great document that spelled out the connections or that one repentant insider willing to walk you through the corporate crime, government malfeasance or law enforcement deceit.

William Heisel's picture

The WIC federal nutrition program has just undergone a makeover, and vouchers are now good for fresh produce and healthy foods. This switch has put thousands of WIC-certified stores through some changes of their own. Rachel Dornhelm reports.

R_Dornhelm's picture

The WIC program, which offers nutrition education and food vouchers to low-income families, will soon get a healthy overhaul. But to cash in, food manufacturers have had to make some adjustments. Rachel Dornhelm reports.

R_Dornhelm's picture

The Women, Infants and Children Program provides food vouchers and nutritional education to low income families. California runs the biggest WIC program in the nation -- 60 percent of all infants born in this state are enrolled in it. Now, the program's changing the kinds of food it recommends.

R_Dornhelm's picture

Most reporters never have the misfortune of being sued for libel. If they are, there are broad free speech protections in court precedent, especially in California, that make it unlikely a plaintiff will win, unless a reporter has been truly reckless.

William Heisel's picture

Are you confused, angry and, frankly, pissed off as you watch sumo-sized egos battle out the mammogram issue? How will it affect you and your loved ones? What actually is the thinking behind the new United States Preventative Services Task Force recommendation to NOT screen women in their forties for breast cancer? Is it as nonsensical as it sounds? Doc Gurley gives you a common sense, plain-language explanation of the ins and outs of this complex issue. She's a practicing board-certified internist who's also published cost-effectiveness research.

docgurley's picture

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth