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Kenneth J. Arrow

Expert Profile

Kenneth J. Arrow

Professor, Economics and Operations Research
Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Stanford University
Expertise: 
medical economics
welfare changes in a dynamic economy
collective decision-making
role of social networks in the labor market

Biography

Dr. Kenneth Arrow is the Joan Kenney professor of economics and professor of operations research, emeritus; a fellow with the Center for Health Policy (CHP) and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR) at Stanford University; and a Stanford Insitute for International Studies (SIIS) senior fellow by courtesy. He is a Nobel Prize-winning economist whose work has been primarily in economic theory and operations, focusing on areas including social choice theory, risk bearing, medical economics, general equilibrium analysis, inventory theory, and the economics of information and innovation. He was one of the first economists to note the existence of a learning curve, and he also showed that under certain conditions an economy reaches a general equilibrium. In 1972, together with Sir John Hicks, he won the Nobel Prize in economics, for his pioneering contributions to general equilibrium theory and welfare theory. Arrow has served on the economics faculties of the University of Chicago, Harvard and Stanford. Prior to that, he served as a weather officer in the U.S. Air Corps (1942-46), and a research associate at the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics (1947-49). In addition to the Nobel Prize, he has received the American Economic Association's John Bates Clark Medal. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. He received a B.S. from City College, an M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University, and holds approximately 20 honorary degrees.

SIEPR
Economics Building
Stanford  California  94305
United States
Office Phone: 
(650) 723-9165
Office Fax: 
(650) 725-5702

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