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Randall S. Stafford

Expert Profile

Randall S. Stafford

Associate Professor, Medicine
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University
Expertise: 
chronic disease prevention and treatment
pharmaceutical costs and marketing
promoting the use of evidence-based medicine
narrowing the \"quality gap\" in health care

Biography

Dr. Randall Stafford is an associate professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center and a fellow at CHP/PCOR. He is an epidemiologist, health services researcher and primary-care internist. His research focuses on improving chronic disease prevention, and exploring the mechanisms by which physicians adopt new prevention practices. Many of his published studies have raised concerns about the so-called \"quality gap\" -- the healthcare system's failure to consistently implement clinically proven therapies -- and have helped shape policy initiatives aimed at improving medical care. His research has also focused on pharmaceutical costs and drug-industry promotion.

From 1994 to 2001 he served on the faculty at Harvard University Medical School and at Massachusetts General Hospital's Institute for Health Policy, where he led several projects that assessed and sought to improve physician practices. As assistant director of primary care operations improvement at Massachusetts General, he led several projects aimed at improving the quality of outpatient care at the hospital.

Stafford earned a B.A. in sociology from Reed College, an M.S. in health administration from Johns Hopkins University, an M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from UC Berkeley. He completed an internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and a fellowship in epidemiology at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

1000 Welch Road
Stanford  California  94304
United States
Office Phone: 
(650) 724-2400
Office Fax: 
(650) 725-6906

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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