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Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Medicare reporting, once a staple of health care journalism, has largely disappeared from health and political beats. Seniors are paying the price.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
There's an urgent need for better media stories that sort through the proposals and give basic descriptions of what the major plans to lower prices would do.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Special interests have been lobbying hard and working the airwaves to convince consumers that any Congressional efforts to correct the surprise billing problem may actually harm patients.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The Trump administration’s new public charge rule could discourage immigrants from accessing everything from emergency services to free flu shots, health experts warn.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The legislative fight in Ohio that tanked several health care bills is a dark sign of the much fiercer fight to come in Congress over surprise bills and patient protections.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
A growing group of small and medium-size businesses have signed on to changing how the nation’s health insurance system works. Here's why they're frustrated.
Picture of Ashley Nguyen
“If you don’t have the money to cover a deductible, your insurance in many ways feels like ‘uninsurance’ to you,” said KFF's Larry Levitt during our recent webinar on the soaring costs of job-based plans.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
“The actual debate won’t be about access — it will be about cost containment for all people,” says Harvard's Robert Blendon, a veteran health care pollster.
Picture of Sara Stewart
A long-running dispute between two major health care companies is coming to a head in western Pennsylvania, with consequences for future hospital-versus-insurer showdowns across the country.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
In New York City, where I live, the ads have reached a new level of silliness. You'll hear plenty about CyberKnives and cancer miracles, and nothing about the number of nurses on the night shift.

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It's been a couple weeks of big headlines touting surprisingly high levels of vaccine efficacy from ongoing trials by Pfizer and Moderna. But huge logistical and ethical challenges remain in getting large swathes of the country vaccinated. Which groups should get their shots first? Join us for our next webinar on Nov. 24 (1-2 p.m. ET), when we’ll take an updated look at those hurdles, and discuss how you can translate this massive and urgent story for audiences in the weeks and months to come. Sign-up here!

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