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Living in the Shadows/Vivir en las Sombras

In our Living in the Shadows series, news organizations from around the country joined together to bring to light the interplay between immigration status and health. We will show where health systems fail some of the most vulnerable and highlight effective solutions to common conditions.

Picture of Ruxandra Guidi

New York journalist Anthony Advincula discusses the challenge of finding a subject willing to speak openly on the sensitive issue.

Picture of Ruxandra Guidi

Reporter Erika Beras discusses her series on the health of refugees and the linguistic, cultural and logistical barriers to health.

Picture of William Heisel

The Resilience of Refugee Children After War report put together by the American Psychological Association offers a a comprehensive assessment of decades of research into the psychological effects of the refugee experience.

Picture of William Heisel

Reporters who have covered immigrant communities may have heard of the “healthy migrant effect.” Here are some of the factors at play in this phenomenon.

Picture of William Heisel

No matter their nationality, people leaving their countries as refugees often show signs of trauma, through PTSD, depression and other mental health problems. These findings provided one of the underpinnings for our Living in the Shadows series.

Picture of William Heisel

Sifting through the scientific literature on immigration and health makes one thing clear above all else: the health of immigrants is very much shaped by the particulars of their background.

Picture of Michelle Levander

Two thirds of America’s population growth between 1995 and 2050 stems from immigration, one recent study found. The health of immigrants increasingly will define the health of America.

Announcements

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

The best journalism these days wraps compelling narratives around scrupulous data analysis. Apply now for our 2021 Data Fellowship to learn the skills necessary to use big data to inform your reporting on health and social welfare issues. Learn more in this webinar on Aug. 3.

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