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Journalism careers

Picture of Richard Webster
“The Children of Central City,” a NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune multimedia series examining the long-term impact of trauma on New Orleans’ children, has won the National Press Foundation’s Carolyn C. Mattingly Award for Mental Health Reporting.
Picture of Cynthia Poten
Young people who call the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation home have seen their community ravaged by the opioid epidemic. Could their voices also shed light on how the crisis might be solved?
Picture of Barbara Laker
“Toxic City: Sick Schools,” a three-part Inquirer investigative series, won the $5,000 Gannett Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, which will be presented to The Inquirer at IRE’s June conference in Houston.
Picture of Sally  James
How reporters can find patients to interview while absorbing valuable background on Twitter.
Picture of Ryan White
How do you make critically important — but potentially boring — stories resonate with your audience? KPCC's content chief Kristen Muller shares her station's approach.
Picture of Judith Mernit
"You can’t just waltz into a community of people who are marginalized and under threat, stick a microphone in their faces and start asking them questions," writes reporter Judith Mernit, a 2018 Impact Fund recipient.
Picture of Susan  Abram
Find the people who can tell the story. Scrutinize death records. Isolate the levers that can create change.
Picture of Ryan White
“For supporters of the ACA, we dodged a bullet,” said UCLA's Gerald Kominski. “However, just because the Dems won the House does not mean the ACA is safe at all.”
Picture of Mabinty Quarshie
"One of the first lessons we learned was the need for patience with survivors. We were often asking people to relive their trauma when we interviewed them and that carried a high emotional cost for families."
Picture of Ryan White
Dr. Damon Francis doesn’t shy away from sparring with a room full of journalists when he thinks the media is getting the story wrong.

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COVID-19 has made every journalist a health reporter, whether their usual beat is crime, education or county government.  Our 2021 California Fellowship will make anyone who attends a better health reporter -- and give you a reporting grant of $2,000-$10,000 and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project. Deadline to apply: March 1.

In our next webinar, we’ll analyze Biden’s COVID-19 strategy in the first 100 days — and the huge obstacles the new federal effort must confront. We’ll also look at how Biden plans to address the economic devastation wrought by the pandemic, with a focus on women and vulnerable families. Sign-up here!

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