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Journalism careers

Picture of William Heisel

What is The Des Moines Register presenting to the world as the big issue of the day in Iowa in the run up to the caucuses? Government mistrust. But this isn’t about Benghazi; this is about far more mundane things, like thwarted record requests and outrageous fees.

Picture of Michelle Levander

We're happy to announce today that we have a new name and a new look. Our program is now known as the Center for Health Journalism, which better reflects our expanded range of programs and goals.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Health insurance premium hikes have been modest in recent years, but out-of-pockets costs are another story. Our Thursday webinar on "Out of Pocket: Surprise Costs After Health Reform" offered a primer on the trends and a host of story ideas for reporting on these topics.

Picture of Katy Butler

We journalists name and often unwittingly frame debates, nudging our readers one way or another. As the recent passage of California's "End of Life Option Act" illustrated, sometimes there aren't any elegant escapes from politically loaded language.

Picture of Ryan White

The Cleveland Plain Dealer’s Brie Zeltner and Rachel Dissel are putting the issue of lead poisoning in children back on the map, publishing a deeply reported series of stories on the issue this week. The ambitious project is worth a closer look.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

There’s no question that prescription drug prices are skyrocketing in the United States, and consumers aren’t happy about it. What’s more complicated, though, is understanding the complexities of the issue and reporting on what those soaring prices mean for consumers.

Picture of Ryan White

Balitmore Sun reporter Andrea McDaniels set out to tell the stories of the children and families who aren’t the direct victims of violence but who suffer its horrible after-effects for years afterwards. Almost nothing about the project was easy, as McDaniels and editor Diana Sugg recently shared.

Picture of Josh Stearns

In recent years, the idea that journalists should focus on building the future of news with communities — not just for them — has gained traction. Josh Stearns profiles the work of Jeremy Hay, who has embraced this community-first approach with a local news service in East Palo Alto.

Picture of Dan  Gorenstein

For three months this year, I spent time with some of the sickest, most expensive patients in America — the so-called "super-utilizers." During that time, I’ve learned about the great promise of programs to help such patients, and why innovations that both improve health and save money are so rare.

Picture of Josh Stearns

Creating in-roads for community participation and giving local people more power to contribute to local journalism is complex and time-intensive. But the end result can be a public that is more engaged in their communities and in supporting news-gathering efforts.

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