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Pedro Frisneda's blog posts

posted 01/11/2011
When I was selected to be part of The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship program back in June 2010, I had three story ideas I wanted to develop for my fellowship projects. They involved three major health problems affecting the Latino community in the United States: health disparities of Latino women, diabetes and obesity among Mexican immigrants and Latinos affected by HIV/AIDS.
posted 08/02/2010

Health authorities have declared the United States on alert, in response to increasing cases of type 2 diabetes in the country. Official reports refer to a threat of major proportions that makes a state of emergency public health, so much so that there is already talk of an emerging epidemic. The most affected are children and members of minorities, particularly Hispanics.

Awards and Updates

2011 Gold Award. Outstanding Multiple Article Series "Una vida nueva, pero con diabetes" - awarded by National Association of Hispanic Publications
2011 Ippie Award. 2nd Place, Best Feature. "A New Life, but with diabetes - awarded by New York Community Media Alliance
2006 Outstanding Health Section - awarded by National Association of Hispanic Publications

Pedro Frisneda's Blog

When I was selected to be part of The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship program... more »
posted 01/11/11
Health authorities have declared the United States on alert, in response to increasing cases of... more »
posted 08/02/10

Pedro Frisneda's Latest Comments

Posted by pfrisneda | Friday, 2010-08-06, 12:58
Frank thank you for your comment! Your topic is very important as well for the Latino community....

Pedro Frisneda's Work

For many Mexican immigrants living in New York, working multiple jobs leaves little time for regular exercise. In addition, a heavy reliance on public transportation and a lack of rural areas means that physical activity is virtually nonexistent. Health experts cite this sedentary lifestyle as an emerging gateway to diabetes, especially among immigrants.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

With limited access to affordable fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods, Mexicans living in New York are frequenting fast food restaurants instead of farmers' markets. The result is a spike in obesity and diabetes among this immigrant group.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 3: In a sedentary country

"It's the alcohol hangover," Gerardo Cuapio thought five years ago when he woke up thirsty and with blurred vision. National Health Journalism Fellow Pedro Frisneda tells the story of a man who was on the verge of death without knowing he had Type 2 diabetes. It's a cautionary tale for what happens to many Latin American immigrants who move to the United States, adopting a new lifestyle and diet that can contribute to developing the disease. "The Big Apple is confronting one of the worst diabetes epidemics in the nation and health authorities have declared it an emergency," with Hispanics suffering disproportionately.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 2: In the kingdom of fats and sugar

Part 3: In a sedentary country