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Bill Graves's blog posts

posted 03/04/2013

Medical experts meeting at the NIH over the next three days are going to try to reach a consensus on whether to shift to a different testing method for gestational diabetes. If they decide to make the shift, the prevalence of gestational diabetes in U.S. pregnancies can be expected to double. 

posted 10/13/2012

Doctors are debating whether to lower the blood-sugar threshold for determining whether a woman has with gestational diabetes. If that happens the number of pregnant women treated for gestational diabetes could more than double.

posted 07/22/2012

    The fifth and final story in my series, "Invisible Nations, Enduring Ills," on health disparities affecting Native Americans in the Portland area ran today on the front page of The Sunday Oregonian. Today's story focuses on the dramatic success and efficiency of an innovative Native American health organization in Anchorage, Alaska, called...

posted 07/08/2012

Candida KingBird, 38, has lived a decade with diabetes and has five children, the last of whom nearly died from problems related to the disease after a cesarean section. The fourth part of my series on health disparities affecting Native Americans in Portland, Ore., tracks her journey through a difficulty, risky sixth pregnancy.

posted 07/06/2012

From the start, I decided I would take as much time as I possibly could – that is the whole year – to complete my project on health disparities affecting Native Americans in the Portland area. I wanted to learn as much as I possibly could not only about Native health, but also about Native cultures.

posted 05/27/2012

Native Americans have the highest diabetes rate among all racial and ethnic groups in America and offer a preview of where the rest of the country is headed. They also have found ways to keep the disease at bay.

posted 05/14/2012

Candida King Bird, 38, the diabetic pregnant mother featured in The Oregonian earlier this month, delivered a healthy 9-pound, 12-ounce girl on Thursday.

posted 08/12/2011

More than 200 Native American doctors are attending a conference in Portland this week to look at health disparities affecting tribes across the nation.

posted 07/22/2011

About 70 percent of the state’s more than 50,000 Native Americans live in Multnomah County, home to Oregon’s largest city, Portland, and have rates of health problems from infant mortality to AIDS that far exceed the general population.

Bill Graves's Blog

Medical experts meeting at the NIH over the next three days are going to try to reach a consensus... more »
posted 03/04/13
Doctors are debating whether to lower the blood-sugar threshold for determining whether a woman... more »
posted 10/13/12
    The fifth and final story in my series, "Invisible Nations, Enduring Ills," on health... more »
posted 07/22/12

Bill Graves's Work

Health care program for Alaska Natives keeps better tabs on patients, often with email and texts, and reduces unnecessary doctor visits. And because patients usually get appointments the day they call, they turn to the emergency room less for primary care.

Candida KingBird, 38, has lived a decade with diabetes and has five children, the last of whom nearly died from problems related to the disease after a cesarean section. Read about her journey through a difficulty, risky sixth pregnancy.

How trauma, alcohol and the chaos they produce undercut Native American health.