Skip to main content.

Elsa Gonzalez, a survivor

Fellowship Story Showcase

Elsa Gonzalez, a survivor

Picture of Jeff  Kelly Lowenstein

For all the difficulties it has faced, from rape as a teenager who impregnated her, the trip north in which he said had to be a prostitute drug dealer, to domestic violence who lived with the father of her second son, Elsa González always clung with one voice: that of his father.

Elsa Gonzalez
Elsa Gonzalez, a survivor
Hoy
Monday, June 11, 2012

For all the difficulties it has faced, from rape as a teenager who impregnated her, the trip north in which he said had to be a prostitute drug dealer, to domestic violence who lived with the father of her second son, Elsa González always clung with one voice: that of his father.

"You must fight," said her father. "When one door closes, another opens." And Gonzalez has followed that advice since childhood, when it was part of a family of 10 children in Jutiapa, Guatemala. At 17, a violation of her pregnant.

Extremely poor, his mother asked initially to abort the baby because the family could not afford to feed another mouth.

Gonzalez refused, was the first child and left him with a brother, and then another.

Eventually, Gonzalez decided he had to go to America to seek a better life.

This meant taking the tough decision to leave his son.

The trip took her to Acapulco, Monterrey and Matamoros.

In Brownsville was deported to Mexico, but returned to the country.

Her mother supported and mortgaged his house for it.

Shortly after arriving in Houston, the godmother of her daughter told Gonzalez that he had to wear dresses, makeup and offered to men.

When he saw that other women in the club dancing half naked, ran to the bathroom and cried.

The godmother of his daughter asked him what was bothering him.

Gonzalez explained his reasons and in response received a slap and a warning that he had no choice.

The next day, she told Gonzalez that he had to distribute drugs among men who were at the house in exchange for $ 20.

Gonzalez left.

Fortunately, he found someone who helped you. He told his story and the woman took her home and placed as a nanny in Los Angeles.

With the father of her daughter, moved to San Francisco and gave birth there.

He physically abused her and broke Gonzalez.

He moved to Hampton, Iowa, where he began working for ovoproductoras DeCoster and Wright County.

The conditions were hellish.

There were rats everywhere.

Supervisors fondled and abused the other undocumented.

The pay was miserable and there was no overtime.

He had no health insurance.

Wanted to resign several times, but thought of her daughter's future and in the words of his father, who helped her go.

Gonzalez also worked to naturalize.

The first lawyer promised a lot, it cost more and got nothing.

But the second was more honest, successfully advised by the abuse she suffered at the hands of the father of her daughter and included that in the case.

In 2010, his residency papers were processed.

Gonzalez has suffered setback after setback.

And while still fighting for their own good, it also helps others.

Gonzalez helped a Mexican friend to end an abusive marriage that often left his face beaten and the couple screaming for hours.

The situation of women put Gonzalez in a dilemma.

On one side would not consent to the violence of her husband. But he also knew that if I called the police that would lead to direct deportation of man, something that did not want.

The struggle continues.

"Mexican stupid, get out of here," Gonzalez heard in the streets of Hampton.

His daughter receives the same kind of insults and bullying at school

The harsh winter of Iowa may end up making it back to Los Angeles.

But wherever you go, be guided by the words of his father.

His spirit remains undisturbed.

This story was originally publishjed on http://www.vivelohoy.com/