Insights

You learn a lot when you spend months reporting on a given issue or community, as our fellows can attest. Whether you’re embarking on a big new story or seeking to go deeper on a given issue, it pays to learn from those who’ve already put in the shoe leather and crunched the data. In these essays and columns, our community of journalists steps back from the notebooks and tape to reflect on key lessons, highlight urgent themes, and offer sage advice on the essential health stories of the day. 

Author(s)
By Valerie Lego

This was a story that began a year and a half before I ever wrote the first word. It was first brought to my attention in July 2011 that Michigan had a toxic history. Nearly 40 years ago, due to human error, cattle feed had been mixed with a flame retardant chemical called PBB.

Author(s)
By Stephanie Lee

I've been selected to participate in the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship sessions in Los Angeles. Here's my game plan.

Author(s)
By Yvonne LaRose

While the news about her return to work was celebratory for all, Robin Roberts talked about some of the expected and probably didn't realize she also disclosed unexpected information.

Author(s)
By William Heisel

In health care, sometimes less is more. Stories that don't explore this option can contribute to higher health care costs and unintended consequences like surgical injuries, pain pill addictions and health care-associated infections.

Author(s)
By Amy Hansen

When it comes to health issues, the southeastern corner of Virginia usually is pretty average. That’s why I was surprised to discover a report that showed a city in my readership area has the highest cancer mortality rate in the state.

Author(s)
By Amy Hansen

When it comes to health issues, the southeastern corner of Virginia usually is pretty average. That’s why I was surprised to discover a report that showed a city in my readership area has the highest cancer mortality rate in the state.