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Fellowship Story Showcase

Explore our 1989 stories.

As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

From Sunda to Bakersfield

Dr. Elyzabat Tadros shares her journey to become a doctor from her native Sudan to her current home in Bakersfield.

Alameda County ahead of curve with realignment

California's prison system reform effort is described as the biggest shift in the criminal justice system in the past 25 years. As counties move forward with their plans, issues have arisen about how the state has allocated funding.

Candida KingBird bows her head in prayer during her baby shower two weeks before her daughter's birth.
Invisible Nations Enduring ills: A Portland diabetic Native American mother risks difficult pregnancy for fresh start

Candida KingBird, 38, has lived a decade with diabetes and has five children, the last of whom nearly died from problems related to the disease after a cesarean section. Read about her journey through a difficulty, risky sixth pregnancy.

Creative thinking a necessity in Stanislaus County

Stanislaus was one of the first counties in California to submit a plan for funding from the Mental Health Services Act, the voter-supported tax on millionaires to expand the state’s mental health services.

Incarceration in Oakland
Lessening the impact of incarceration on Oakland - An overview

The cycling of mostly men of color through the California prison system and onto the streets of Oakland is a revolving door that impacts communities and the families that deal with having a brother, father, son or mother who has spent time in prison.

Foreign physicians in Kern share their stories

Kern's physicians come from many far-flung corners of the globe. This piece takes a look at several compelling personal journeys.

Concerns about the quality of Caribbean schools persist

Concerns about the quality of Caribbean-educated students aren't completely unsubstantiated. A 2010 study published in Health Affairs examined mortality rates of nearly 250,000 hospitalizations. The patients of foreign-born international medical graduates had the lowest patient death rates while U.S. citizens who study abroad had the highest rates -- a difference authors called "striking."

Many American students turn to Caribbean medical schools

Jesse Cottrell is a fourth-year medical student who decided to attend the American University of the Caribbean for a simple reason: "I couldn't get into a U.S. school."

As mental health budgets shrink and services erode in Stanislaus County California, Aspen Family Medical Group, a primary care clinic, has taken on a key role in treating the county's uninsured mentally ill.

KMC's multimillion dollar deal with Caribbean school marks part of controversial trend

Kellie Schmitt reports on a Caribbean medical school that recently agreed to pay Kern Medical Center $35 million to have its students train at the cash-strapped county hospital. Some see this as one way to help solve the U.S. shortage of primary care physicians. Others worry because Caribbean medical schools don't receive the same accreditation as their U.S counterparts.

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