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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Hallways like this one at Whole Woman's Health will have to be widened as part of the new legislation for abortion clinics to become ASCs.

Proponents of the new abortion regulations in Texas say they improve safety standards to protect women's health at facilities that perform abortions. Abortion rights advocates argue that they've endangered women's safety and imposed on their constitutional right to an abortion.

In a small Nevada town once plagued by childhood cancer, families still search for answers to what caused the cluster of cases. Some suspected environmental causes, but so little is still understood about pollutants and cancer.

Photo by: Stephen Spillman

A state Senate Health and Human Services Committee hearing Thursday will assess Texas’ efforts to expand access to women’s health services across the state. But abortion rights advocates say an essential issue has been left off the agenda — the impact of strict abortion regulations passed last year.

Lyvonne Cargill, left, listens with family members and friends on Thursday at the trial of Chauncey Owens and Charles Jones, who are accused of killing 17-year-old Je'Rean Blake Nobles. (Todd McInturf / The Detroit News)

Nearly 500 Detroit children have died in homicides since 2000 — an average of nearly three dozen a year. Most were gun-related, and most were among children 14-18. Many youngsters just got in the way of a bullet intended for an adult, or for no one in particular.

It’s impossible to say how much of a health risk illiteracy poses for Detroit children. But those working with Detroit parents say poor reading skills make it harder for parents to raise healthy kids, support families or prepare children with skills needed to enter school ready to learn.

Tanisha Jones checks the blood pressure of Derrick Jenkins, 7, aboard a mobile clinic outside Dixon elementary school. (Photos by Max Ortiz / The Detroit News)

Hospital systems, nonprofits and foundations are finding innovative ways to improve health and safety for kids and work around obstacles that have stymied progress in the past.

Alzheimer’s disease caregivers, usually elderly spouses or working adult children, face higher risk of physical and mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and heart problems. Stressed caregivers are 63 percent more likely to die within four years compared to non-caregivers.

Dr. Roberto Romero, chief of the Perinatology Research Branch and head of the Program for Perinatal Research and Obstetrics, speaks on late-preterm births and the issue of a short cervix in relation of infant mortality. (Max Ortiz / The Detroit News)

Women who have a cervix that is shorter than 25 mm, have a 70 percent greater risk of delivering their babies at less than 33 weeks of gestation. But research conducted in Detroit has uncovered a promising treatment for women with short cervixes -- vaginal progesterone.

Duggan (Daniel Mears / The Detroit News)

Mayor Mike Duggan said he’s well aware of Detroit’s infant mortality problem and to tackle it he will draw upon his experience as president and CEO of the Detroit Medical Center, a position he held from 2004 until he resigned to enter Detroit’s mayoral race.

Darnella Miller, 24, of Detroit is expecting her fourth child. She's taking parenting classes so she can get her three other kids out of foster care. Max Ortiz / The Detroit News

Since 1986, Detroit's Infant Mortality program has had more than 1,600 babies born and only five infant deaths with no maternal deaths. The majority of participants are African-American women between 16 and 27 years old, and 98 percent are single mothers living at or below the poverty line.

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