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Fellowship Story Showcase

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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

The Globeville area of Denver once attracted immigrants from around the world to work the dangerous smelter jobs, and at the adjoining rail yards, and the meatpacking operations that came later. It's now hoping to clean up its environment and experience a renaissance of reconstruction and rebirth.

Carlos Sanchez ignored his diabetes for 15 years and failed to take his medication. It wound up costing him part of a leg. Here, he plays catch with his nephew outside his brother's home in South Los Angeles.

Patients come each month to the To Help Everyone (T.H.E.) Clinic, hoping to finally gain the upper hand on their diabetes, a disease wreaking havoc on their bodies — and their community.

Northside redevelopment
Northside: Story of the mill village is a familiar one

Spartanburg, S.C., began as a bustling mill town, but parts of the city went downhill after drug dealers infiltrated some neighborhoods. Now the rebirth of the Northside is creating an opportunity for new life.

Doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at community clinics work long hours treating multitudes of patients, who often have more than one chronic illness.

East End residents want to improve the health in their community. Their key priorities are parental involvement, workforce development, and mental health and well-being.

Northside neighborhood

A Spartanburg, S.C., neighborhood once known primarily as a hotbed for violence and crime is now the home of a medical college and has attracted the attention of city officials, philanthropists and even a group connected to billionaire investor Warren Buffett.

Both socioeconomic and public health cases can be made for dismantling the projects. People who live in Richmond, Va.'s, public housing for the duration of their lives are more likely to develop more illness and die younger than residents of other neighborhoods in the region.

Marian DeVeaux, left, and Dick Seely challenged each other with 10 push ups near the end of their two-mile wellness walk around Fairfield Court and the surrounding neighborhood. They and others signed up for the walk through the Fairfield Court Resource Center. James Wallace

Richmond, Va.'s, communities differ vastly in the resources available for residents to pursue good health, and the result is a 12-year or more gap in average life expectancy in neighborhoods just miles apart.

Dr. Sheldon Wasserman, center, chairman of the Wisconsin Medical Examining Board, talks with Tom Ryan, right, executive director of the board. On the left are board members Jude Genereaux and Dr. Gene Musser. The 13-member board, appointed by the governor, includes 10 doctors and three public members. M.P. King

The budget for Wisconsin's medical board appears to be smaller than for boards in other states. It's one of several factors that limit the board, its leaders say.

Many families in Detroit must cope with the slaying of a family member. Marcel Jackson was killed while working as a security guard, leaving behind, from left, Tarik, 13; wife Hollie holding Aaliyah, 2; Jala, 16; Najidah, 18; Tamia, 13; and Gwendolyn, 7. (Photos by Max Ortiz / The Detroit News)

Living in unsafe or poor neighborhoods can be stressful for children — stress that for some children is compounded by trauma. Early intervention is the key to minimizing the long-term impacts of chronic stress or trauma on children’s health.

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Announcements

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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