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Fellowship Story Showcase

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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Evidence of addiction shows an alarming escalation, Noozhawk finds in Prescription for Abuse special report

Many Americans might cite cocaine or heroin if asked to identify the country’s leading cause of overdose deaths.

Wrong answer.

What makes or keeps us healthy often has nothing to do with what happens in our doctor's office or a hospital. Angila Griffin made this discovery a few months ago when a community health worker stopped by to check on her kids, who have asthma. Jean Figaro came armed with vinegar and baking soda. They're cleaning products, he explained.

Gauging the Coachella Valley's health: How long will you live?

Nicole Brambila examines some of the factors — income, education, healthy food access and neighborhood safety, just to name a few — that contribute to life expectancy in the Coachella Valley.

Latinas avoid the doctor

The anti-immigrant sentiment that some Latinas in Georgia are experiencing has led some women to refrain from scheduling routine medical exams that could save their lives.

Radon regulation varies widely from state to state

Californians are required to disclose the radon level in their home, if known, before transferring it to a new owner. Nevadans are not. In both states, renters are particularly vulnerable. "There are no regulations to protect renters from radon in Nevada," said Susan Howe, radon education program director for the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. "There are no regulations dealing with radon in Nevada, period. There are no laws to protect people when they buy or build homes."

Radon exposure risk could be greater than expected, effects difficult to measure

More than two decades after U.S. regulators first issued guidelines on radon infiltration into homes and buildings, the World Health Organization reports that the radon threat to human health is much more serious than previously known.

Major Health Problems Linked to Poverty

Living without running water, sanitation services or paved roads, people living in Texas colonias face grim health risks, Hunt Grant recipient Emily Ramshaw reports for the Texas Tribune/New York Times.

Improvement Comes Up Short in South Texas Colonias

Nearly half a million Texans live in substandard conditions in colonias -- 2,300 unincorporated and isolated border towns with limited access to potable water, sewer systems, electricity, sanitary housing or health care. Emily Ramshaw reports on their health conditions.

 

It might be roof-top green space. Perhaps a reconfiguration of streets that permits walkable medians and wide bike lanes. Or it could be a supercharging of current joint-use plans between cities and school districts.

The most likely scenario would be a combination of these solutions and many more as community leaders in North Orange County try to overcome a dearth of city parkland.

Santa Ana's childhood obesity rates are among the highest in Orange County. Neighborhood advocates have complained bitterly about what they say is a lack of official effort to create adequate places for the city's children to play, and an entrenched deference to developers.

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Announcements

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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