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Fellowship Story Showcase

Explore our 2083 stories.

As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

The lack of support for breastfeeding in hospitals has a bigger effect on low-income mothers. It is common for hospitals to offer formula for newborn babies or separate them from their mothers at birth, without medical reason. Such practices are considered huge barriers to breastfeeding because they hinder the start.

Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

Tooth decay among kids is rampant

Del Norte County has a serious problem with tooth decay. In fact, the problem is spread across California — a recent study found that two-thirds of the state’s children have some form of tooth decay. Kelley Atherton finds out why.

Healthy Food for California Farm Workers

California’s Central Valley, also known as the greatest garden in the world, has by far the highest agricultural production in the country. But those who work in “the garden,” rarely benefit from the fresh fruits and vegetables they harvest.

One-third in Tulare County use Medi-Cal

Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a one-third of its population on Medi-Cal — California's version of Medicaid. This is more than any other county in the state, yet the resources to care for the Medi-Cal population are few.

Tulare County ranks 44th in doctor-to-population ratio

A look into why Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a severe lack of physicians.

“Tenemos los baños y los break rooms (cuartos de descanso de los empleados)”, respondió Perla Rodríguez, vocera de los supermercados Mi Pueblo, cuando se le preguntó si la compañía les ofrece a las empleadas que amamantan un lugar especial para extraerse la leche.

Al mencionársele que los baños no eran considerados higiénicos para tal uso y los cuartos de descanso de los trabajadores no brindaban la privacidad necesaria, sugirió que las empleadas podían entonces usar las oficinas donde se llevan a cabo las reuniones de los directivos de la empresa. Aunque aclaró que nunca se ha presentando el caso. Y dijo que todos los trabajadores reciben sus descansos.

Who will be the winners and losers amid health reform's planned expansion of Medicaid? In her reporting, Danielle Ivory finds shifting power dynamics and unexpected financial risks for insurers. 

 

School Lunches as Profit Engines

Choicelunch, one of a handful of private companies that provide school lunches in the Bay Area, has helped Havens Elementary meet parent demand for nutritious and tasty foods produced in a sustainable manner. It has also helped with another of the parents’ goals: turning the lunch program into a profit center.  

 

Largo woman breaks bad diet habits to lose 240 pounds

At 364 pounds, Dawn Walton found her breaking point, literally, when she sat down for a meet and greet at her son's kindergarten class. "I felt the chair start to break beneath me," Walton, 35, said. "I knew it would kill him if I broke that chair." She made a bargain with God that day: If the seat didn't break, she'd change her lifestyle for good.

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Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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