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Fellowship Story Showcase

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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Getting Outdoors in South Los Angeles

There are a lot reasons to head to South Los Angeles and hiking probably isn't at the top of your list. As home to nearly one million people, the region is one of the densest areas, but also the most park poor. There are 92 parks and recreation areas in South Los Angeles totaling about 1,200 acres. That translates to 1.2 acres for every 1,000 people, significantly less than the national standard of 6 acres. Of what's available, here are a handful of accessible areas of significant size that offer a chance to get back to nature and beauty within the city -- with a physical challenge, of course.

How do you build a healthy community?

The health of South Los Angeles suffers in part because much of this area was designed for the poor. The infrastructure itself plays a role. How did western L.A. County end up having 59 acres of park space per 1,000 people and South L.A. end up with 1.2? Many of the problems we are facing today were built into the very structure of the Los Angeles area. Today's environmental injustice was no accident in the Los Angeles area.

Fifth story in series on medical discharges of S.B.'s homeless

For two years, Bill Shea lived on the property of Christ the King Episcopal Church. As homeless camps go, it was average. He slept in a field, in a decent bag, and with the blessing of the church's rector. He was surviving — if nothing else.

Obesity is a problem in Los Angeles, but South LA suffers more

While obesity is a problem for Americans in all walks of life, it’s worse when you don’t live near a park, when access to public transportation is limited, when sidewalks are broken and streetlights are few. In fact, a National Institutes of Health study found that just living in a socioeconomically deprived area leads to weight gain and a greater risk of dying at an early age. In stark terms, people in Culver City live an average of eight years longer than people in Jefferson Park, according to Crump. Yet these two communities in the middle of Los Angeles are only a couple of miles apart.

Marc Laver’s daughter was nearly hit by a car on the way to school the second day of kindergarten in 2009.

Mental health patients often don't get the physical health care they need. Journalist Martha Bebinger examines efforts to find these patients a new "medical home."

The automobile is a fixture of American life, and in rural areas like Lake County’s it’s critical to getting to and from school, work and other commitments. But for drivers in Lake County, the roadways can be dangerous places.

Hartmann Road – an entry point into the Hidden Valley Lake gated community – intersects with a wide, sweeping curve of Highway 29. In appearance, it's an unremarkable stretch of roadway. But the statistics showed that something had to be done.

The safety of Lake County’s roadways is a matter of great concern not just for drivers but for officials and agencies across a broad spectrum – from health to planning, public works to law enforcement.

Fourth in a series looks at L.A.’s oldest and largest medical respite program

Curtis Jasper has come a long way since December, when he was living on the streets of Los Angeles, all but crippled by multiple ulcers on his legs. For eight years he tended his ulcers by himself on the streets, changing his dressings in bathrooms in public libraries and restaurants — any place he could find running water and soap.

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