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Fellowship Story Showcase

Explore our 2214 stories.

As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

A growing national movement seeks to connect ex-offenders with health care services. Many people say it makes financial sense. Some say it can possibly reduce crime.

Medical training covers very little on how to confront dying and death with their patients and their families. Marketplace's Caitlan Carroll visits the San Diego Hospice and the Institute for Palliative Medicine, where they are training physicians on how to tailor care around patients' last wishes.

End-of-life care is often the most expensive health care. Many people, when given the option, choose to opt out of experimental therapies and drugs as they approach death, but the current health care system structure incentivizes more care instead of less. So patients' wishes often get left out of the equation.

About 50 miles east of Los Angeles, Mira Loma, Calif. has a very active warehouse district and some of the worst air pollution in the country. Residents concerned for their health want to prevent more warehouses from cropping up.

Children from low-income families may be able to take advantage of government funds for health care. Some obstacles may prevent these families from using these funds, like language knowledge and immigration status. Eduardo A. de Oliveira reports.

When someone living in New York's West African Communities shows signs of mental illness, friends and family don't send the individual to a doctor. The community gathers up enough money to send them to Africa for treatment. Laura Starecheski reports from New York.

Although teen suicide attempts have declined gradually since the 1990s, death by suicide has risen 8 percent among teenagers, according to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, it’s the third leading cause of death for teens between the ages of 15 and 19. While each suicide is a unique story, there is a common thread: More than 90 percent of teens who kill themselves show signs of major depression or another mental illness in the year prior to their deaths.

In the space of eight months, five teenagers committed suicides by throwing themselves in front of trains in the California town of Palo Alto.

Should Soccer Players Wear Head Protection?

Should amateur and professional soccer players wear some kind of head protection to prevent against concussions? We speak to several experts about the frequency of head injuries in soccer, and about the arguments for having players wear some kind of head protection.

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