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Fellowship Story Showcase

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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

In response to the Wisconsin State Journal series “Doctor Discipline” that examined the state's dismal record of serious disciplinary actions against bad doctors, the Wisconsin Medical Examining Board formed a committee to create better guidelines for disciplining doctors.

Health investigators at Drexel University want medical centers to start asking patients what kind of work they do.

Investigators at the University of Pennsylvania are studying what is takes to get a good night's sleep in Philadelphia.

Starting next year, clinics in rural and urban areas will begin seeing millions of newly insured patients, and face higher expectations to keep costs down. Clinics are trying to improve the odds of keeping these patients healthy, but many are too ill or resistant to altering behavior.

Gov. Steve Bullock

Cindy Uken's series on suicide in Montana for the Billings Gazette got the attention of state policymakers, who are now beginning to make some changes....

Photo Credit: KCRW

What has diesel pollution done to community health around the Los Angeles Port complex? California Fellow Tena Rubio tackled the story for KCRW.

Autism, a condition once considered rare, now afflicts an estimated 1 in 88 children in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). And while autism is more common among white children, the largest increases in diagnoses over time have been among Hispanic children.

Jackie YellowTail smudges herself with cedar smoke in her home near Garryowen. YellowTail's 16-year-old son committed suicide in January 2001. She says her faith has pulled her through the tragedy. JAMES WOODCOCK/Gazette Staff

Jackie YellowTail dares to break the Crow taboo by calling out the name of her dead son. She wants to break the stigma of suicide, especially on Indian reservations.

Letitia Stewart talks about losing her 21-year-old son, Edward Bee Fast Horse III, to suicide on Dec. 29, 2008. She feared her son's soul had been lost afterward, but her pastor assured her that was not the case. "That really lifted that burden. It made me feel better. I believe he's in heaven."  JAMES WOODCOCK/Gazette Staff

A mom recounts the story of how she and her grandchildren witnessed the suicide of her son. “I was hoping there wouldn’t be too much damage," she said. "We tried to sit him up so he didn’t choke. Then I reached over and felt his pulse. I knew he was gone."

The latest spate of suicides has shaken the Crow Indian Reservation, even as Montana tribal leaders and tribal communities undertake aggressive intervention efforts to reduce the rate of suicide among their youth.

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More than 100 anti-transgender rights bills were introduced in state legislatures this year. Many focus on children and teens. Join us for our next Health Matters webinar, where we'll explore the health and well-being of transgender youth as states such as Arkansas and Tennessee seek to limit their rights. Our expert panel will share the latest research, seed story ideas and offer reporting advice. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

The best journalism these days wraps compelling narratives around scrupulous data analysis. Apply now for our 2021 Data Fellowship to learn the skills necessary to use big data to inform your reporting on health and social welfare issues. Learn more in this webinar on Aug. 3.

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